Get it All

As much as I love WordPress, I am continually frustrated with the pace at which forms get created. That’s because, while WordPress seems to have thought of everything else, the most basic part of creating interactive websites seems to have been ignored: the forms.

Yes. There are front end form builders like Ninja Forms. But while they all work well within their own context, much of the customization of the forms either requires additional, paid-for plugins or simply isn’t possible due to constraints of the plugins themselves. Besides which: I’m not often building front-end forms, but rather forms to add metadata to posts or set configuration variables for the site.

What I have wanted and needed was something like CakePHP’s FormHelper: an interface that simplifies the process of outputting HTML5-valid forms and inputs. Something that allows me to specify the settings for an input, and puts the aggravating process of laying out the form in it’s own hands. And so I created EasyInputs: A Forms generator for WordPress.

The plugin is still in early stages of development. But so far, I’ve been able to clean up and cut down on code for one of my other projects significantly. And besides speed and accuracy, there are a couple of key advantages to building forms in this way. For a start, if you’re trying to keep your WP code as close as possible to PSR2 standards, adding values to an array is a lot more convenient than sprintf’ing the long HTML code associated with forms. Secondly, the code output from my plugin is significantly clearer than a rat’s nest of escaped and unescaped HTML code.

WP-Scholar’s Person CPT with escaped HTML:

WP-Scholar’s Person CPT with EasyInputs:

This is just a relatively basic example. The plan is to support every HTML-valid input including <datalist>, <keygen> and <output>. Right now, these new elements are missing. I’ll be updating that shortly (perhaps before you even read this!), along with some basic HTML security: every EasyInputs text input will include the maxlength attribute.

I know that the WordPress devs are working on some sort of fields API. But as I’ve observed it, the development process still banks too heavily on bringing those fields into the WP regime, which may satisfy the needs of the WordPress team, seems too rigidly focused. Developers don’t need a complete solution for every little thing, they need simple tools that do simple things well. That’s the aim of this development project.

Please have a look at the latest stable tag and tell me what you think!